September122014

sondern. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.

sonder
n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.

(Source: fleur-issant, via sirtearex)

July152014
May162014

iamawug said: How did you create the font for your language? Like, on a computer and stuff, lol

lhaasiri:

image

How to Make a Conscript Font

First, thanks for the question! I’m more than happy to help out. For this, you’ll need a program like Adobe Illustrator, InkScape, or Photoshop. I’m using Illustrator. 

Step 1: Make a Script

This isn’t really the main focus of my answer, but just for anyone reading this later, you’re going to want to start by actually making a handwritten script. Your imagination’s the limit, and I would recommend doodling random squiggles on some paper and then narrowing it down to forms that you like. That’s how I did it (-cough- in the margins of my notebooks during class -cough-). 

For inspiration, Omniglot is nice.

Moving along… 

Step 2: Making it Digital 

Now is where you really have a lot of options for customizing the look of your script, which will become a “font.” You can scan your handwriting if possible, or you can try and freehand your digital font. 

2a: Importing your handwritten script 

Open a new document in Adobe Illustrator (or your other program) and then, if applicable, copy and paste (or just drag and drop)  your handwritten script into your new document.

Note: It may appear gigantic, in which case you can press Ctrl -/Cmd - to zoom out. Then click your image to make sure it’s got an outline, grab one of the four corner points while holding the Shift button, and shrink it down. And press Ctrl + / Cmd + to zoom back in. 

I’ll show a sample: 

image

2b: Preparing the workspace 

Now  you’re gonna need to go to Window > Layers. If in another program, just find your layers panel. You’ll see that you have one layer called “Layer 1.” To the left of the layer’s name, click the grey box so that a lock icon appears: 

image

Then click the add layer button in the bottom right corner (it looks like a post-it note with its corner upturned). A new layer will appear above Layer 1. This is where you’ll make your letters. 

2c: Tracing Shapes

Find the pen tool (or press P). Zoom into your document so you can see the shapes up close, and then begin the tracing process. Find a letter, click at either its very beginning or its very end with your pen tool, and start tracing the shape. 

image

Note: for straight lines, you can simply click at the corners with the pen tool. The pen tool makes straight lines by default. If you hold Shift when clicking, it will make a perfect line at 0, 45, or 90 degrees based on the position where you click. If you want to make a curved line, click at the beginning of your letter and then find the end of a nearby curve. Click and hold the mouse, then drag it until the curve conforms to the curvature of the handwritten letter. 

image

I can’t really explain how to use the pen tool, but keep tracing the shapes until you get the hang of it. You will eventually! 

To change the color of the line you make, choose a color from the stroke dropdown at the top of your window. You can also double click the stroke box at the left side of the screen: 

image

After some fiddling, I got this: 

image

This is not the method I used for łaá siri’s font, though. I think this method is probably the most general and easily applied as a starting point. For łaá siri’s font, which is only a mix of circles and lines, I started off with the circle tool to create a perfect circle and then added lines in order to modify them. 

Also, I would recommend setting up a horizontal guide with a baseline (bottom of the letter), medium (middle of letter/x-height), and cap line (absolute top of the letter), like this: 

image

I did this and it’s super convenient for being consistent. 

So after a bunch of time/work/perseverance, you’ll end up with some different letters, which you can select with the pointer tool (press A) and then right click > Group. When you group them, they’ll become a single unit that will move collectively rather than individually. It’s useful for cloning letters that are made of multiple strokes with the pen tool. 

This walkthrough is obviously missing things and not as detailed as it could be, but hopefully this will help with developing a “font” like I have. When you have all of your letters set, you will be able (in Illustrator) to copy and paste them into Photoshop or save them as individual files for later use with a program like FontForge (which I still can’t even install because it’s so confusing…) 

And I’ll leave you with a screenshot of how my font document is set up, if at least for reference. c: 

image

Whenever I need a letter or a diacritic, I just copy the letter from this document. As you can see, the letters are really just composed of lines and modified circles! 

Hope this helps~ 

May152014
theglasscage:

lolcatsdeamon13:

thelifeofalinguist:

In modern phonological circles, groups concerned with understanding sound changes within a language, the common theory is that each segment has a series of features connected to it. 
These features act as a set of instructions which are then deconstructed in the brain, and reassembled as electronic and nerve impulses allowing us to produce the correct sound.
Speaking from experience, remembering all of these distinct features and their presence in different sounds/phones can be quite the challenge! Hopefully this helps!
(As an added bonus, it also includes a complete IPA Chart, Diacritics Guide, and a map of the human body as it relates to language and speech production!)

Also you should go to this site to hear all the sounds!

personally, i prefer this site [x], its the one my phonetics professor recommends as well :)

theglasscage:

lolcatsdeamon13:

thelifeofalinguist:

In modern phonological circles, groups concerned with understanding sound changes within a language, the common theory is that each segment has a series of features connected to it. 

These features act as a set of instructions which are then deconstructed in the brain, and reassembled as electronic and nerve impulses allowing us to produce the correct sound.

Speaking from experience, remembering all of these distinct features and their presence in different sounds/phones can be quite the challenge! Hopefully this helps!

(As an added bonus, it also includes a complete IPA Chart, Diacritics Guide, and a map of the human body as it relates to language and speech production!)

Also you should go to this site to hear all the sounds!

personally, i prefer this site [x], its the one my phonetics professor recommends as well :)

(via heylola2)

8PM

flappermermaid:

"made up pronouns"

All pronouns are made up

All words are made up

That is what language is

A series of words that humans made up

(via heylola2)

March152014

xevboxcorner said: Do you have a specific way that you create your syntax and grammar, or do you just "wing it"? Also, is there any advice (or links) you can give about that topic?

strawberrylemonademod:

heylola2s-conlangs:

heylola2:

One thing - Describing Morphosyntax. It’s a great book. You might be able to find the PDF online- I did a few years ago- but I have the hard copy too. 

This is great too, as is WALS. If you help need to create a lexicon, this is amazing (you can download all of it - I printed it all out). You can use Awkwords and the Language Construction Kit’s (zompist) generators. 

I usually translate things and figure things out when I get to them, but I start with some things based on how I want the language to sound (in terms of phonology and structure).

I take the people (conworlding) to mind too, how they live and their culture. 

Also, I’m a linguistics major  (and I’ve studied 6 languages in school and I collect over 500 language books) so I can kind of just ‘wing it’ because I know a bit about languages and linguistics. 

(And I’ve been doing it since I was 15)

Thank you so much! This was very helpful!
Unfortunately, I’m not so knowing about language in general. I have only been doing this since summer last year, and I only know English. I’m building from the ground up (and it feels dark and scary down here…)

I mostly enjoy grammar and linguistics, I only speak English as well, even though I have studied many languages. I study them more for grammar and just learning about languages rather than communication.

If you ever need any help, I’m here, and if you join the conlangs group on facebook, you’ll always find help.

March142014

xevboxcorner said: Do you have a specific way that you create your syntax and grammar, or do you just "wing it"? Also, is there any advice (or links) you can give about that topic?

heylola2:

One thing - Describing Morphosyntax. It’s a great book. You might be able to find the PDF online- I did a few years ago- but I have the hard copy too. 

This is great too, as is WALS. If you help need to create a lexicon, this is amazing (you can download all of it - I printed it all out). You can use Awkwords and the Language Construction Kit’s (zompist) generators. 

I usually translate things and figure things out when I get to them, but I start with some things based on how I want the language to sound (in terms of phonology and structure).

I take the people (conworlding) to mind too, how they live and their culture. 

Also, I’m a linguistics major  (and I’ve studied 6 languages in school and I collect over 500 language books) so I can kind of just ‘wing it’ because I know a bit about languages and linguistics. 

(And I’ve been doing it since I was 15)

2PM
dachiikardak:

May you dream in your language.

dachiikardak:

May you dream in your language.

(via heylola2)

4AM

heylola2s-conlangs:

Here’s my new conscript for my new conlang, Ashazi. 

It’s written vertically and read from left to right, but can also be written circular (radiating from the center, NOT a spiral) and read starting with the line pointing directly up.

The smaller picture is just a conceptual idea of how it will look written. It doesn’t say anything, just a random mix of letters. 

The script is supposed to resemble plants. 

I just thought you guys might be interested in seeing this.

I haven’t done much of anything with the conlang yet, it’s still going around in my mind. 

In other news, I got to work with Klingon in my linguistics class - I wore a Star Trek shirt on tuesday and I think my teacher picked up on that.

4AM

Here’s my new conscript for my new conlang, Ashazi. 

It’s written vertically and read from left to right, but can also be written circular (radiating from the center, NOT a spiral) and read starting with the line pointing directly up.

The smaller picture is just a conceptual idea of how it will look written. It doesn’t say anything, just a random mix of letters. 

The script is supposed to resemble plants. 

I just thought you guys might be interested in seeing this.

I haven’t done much of anything with the conlang yet, it’s still going around in my mind. 

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